Cinema Scholars Series Presents: Daniel Biltereyst

Location: 
Gerlinger Lounge
Date: 
Apr 15, 2015, 2:30 pm

Cinema Scholars_Biltereyst_8x11_FINALCinema Studies presents the Cinema Scholars Series

What can we learn from the history of film censorship?

Today's media and communications seem at odds with the idea of censorship. However, in this so-called post-disciplinary society, there is a renewed interest in traditional models of censorship. This talk will argue that we can learn a lot from why, where and how censorship emerged and operated.

A public lecture by Daniel Biltereyst

Professor in Film and Media Studies at the Department of Communication Studies -- Ghent University, Belgium

Head of Department and Director of the Centre for Cinema and Media Studies (CIMS)

 

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

2:30 pm Reception

3:00 pm Lecture

Gerlinger Lounge -- Free

Please join us for a reception with Daniel Biltereyst at 2:30 pm, followed by the lecture at 3 pm.  Light refreshments will be served before and after the event.

Thank you to our co-sponsors:

School of Journalism & Communication/Media Studies Program Department of Comparative Literature

Daniel Biltereyst

Daniel Biltereyst is Professor in Film and Media Studies at the Department of Communication Studies, Ghent University, Belgium, in addition to being Head of Department and Director of the Centre for Cinema and Media Studies (CIMS). His work deals with media and the public sphere, more specifically with film and screen culture as sites of controversy, public debate and moral/media panic. He has supervised several wide-scale research projects, including one on the history of state film censorship and religious film classification in Belgium; two projects on film exhibition and cinema-going; as well as one on queer representations in screen culture. He is co-editor of the Film and Television Studies series, the author of several books, and co-editor of various collections, including Explorations in New Cinema History; Cinema, Audiences and Modernity; and Silencing Cinema: Film Censorship around the World.